Covid vs. Common Cold question

aix_xpert

Heisman Candidate
Sep 5, 2001
10,804
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To the medical individuals out there (@Medic007, @blbronco, and others):

I have three questions:

1) When someone gets a Covid test, would having the common cold, which is also a coronavirus, pop a positive?
2) The media talks about the rapid mutations of Covid (the UK variant, the Brazil variant, South African variant, etc) and how dangerous each variant might be. Is this rapid mutation normal for other Coronaviruses (such as the common cold)?
3) Knowing both Covid and the common cold are coronaviruses, does the Covid vaccine grant increased immunity to the common cold?
 

osuintx

All-American
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Jan 31, 2004
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They actually got a positive COVID test From a Friggin pineapple. PCR tests are recommended To operate at 17 cycles- they have been set at 40 give or take all this time until November then were scaled back- they can make them read positive whenever they want them to.
Early they wanted many cases- they got em.

CDC - Big Pharma and many medical people are big time compromised and make way more money when people are sick- anyone ever look up what they make each year with cancer? It's mind boggling. Reason why most medical people won't recommend clean diets- they make WAY more when we're sick-Reason why medical schoolS spend like I millionth of their time on prevention.
 

JonnyVito

MegaPoke is insane
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Mar 12, 2008
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My family has had three cold run through our household in the last month. None of us have popped for Covid. I do agree with @osuintx that since November they have done something with the test and I assume he is right in that they have scaled them back a bit and you aren't seeming the false positives as much IMO.
 

100TonsofOrangeFury

MegaPoke is insane
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May 29, 2001
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1) My PCR sample was checked for 5 different coronaviruses. I'd assume they all function basically this way. If every common cold produced a positive covid test result, that would be the worst test ever made.
2) Yes. But note that none are "more dangerous", they're simply different and possibly more transmissable.
3) Probably not, unless those other coronaviruses feature the same spike protein, which is what the vaccines endeavor to produce.
 

aix_xpert

Heisman Candidate
Sep 5, 2001
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1) My PCR sample was checked for 5 different coronaviruses. I'd assume they all function basically this way. If every common cold produced a positive covid test result, that would be the worst test ever made.
2) Yes. But note that none are "more dangerous", they're simply different and possibly more transmissable.
3) Probably not, unless those other coronaviruses feature the same spike protein, which is what the vaccines endeavor to produce.

Thank you Tons. I would note on #2 in regards to variants, the media has consistently stated that different variants may be both more contagious and more lethal. That actually comes straight from the mouth of Colonel Klink, uh sorry, Dr. Fauci.
 
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blbronco

Heisman Candidate
Gold Member
Jan 9, 2002
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To the medical individuals out there (@Medic007, @blbronco, and others):

I have three questions:

1) When someone gets a Covid test, would having the common cold, which is also a coronavirus, pop a positive?
2) The media talks about the rapid mutations of Covid (the UK variant, the Brazil variant, South African variant, etc) and how dangerous each variant might be. Is this rapid mutation normal for other Coronaviruses (such as the common cold)?
3) Knowing both Covid and the common cold are coronaviruses, does the Covid vaccine grant increased immunity to the common cold?

1) No. COVID-19 is a group 2b coronavirus which differs from the common cold (common cold includes coronaviruses, adenoviruses and a few others). This is especially true in the PCR testing, which is specific for 3 components unique to SARS-CoV-2. Even the antigen and antibody tests are specific to this one.
2) No, at least to my knowledge, sort of. Common cold-causing viruses do undergo mutations/shifts. Other group 2b coronaviruses (SARS-1, MERS-CoV) do not change that much, though the others are far less contagious, but more lethal. SARS-CoV-2 is playing by different rules.
3) nope. The COVID-19 vaccine (pfizer/moderna, at least) is geared specifically for an antigen on the large surface protein. This is not shared with those coronaviruses that cause the common cold.
 

aix_xpert

Heisman Candidate
Sep 5, 2001
10,804
8,345
113
1) No. COVID-19 is a group 2b coronavirus which differs from the common cold (common cold includes coronaviruses, adenoviruses and a few others). This is especially true in the PCR testing, which is specific for 3 components unique to SARS-CoV-2. Even the antigen and antibody tests are specific to this one.
2) No, at least to my knowledge, sort of. Common cold-causing viruses do undergo mutations/shifts. Other group 2b coronaviruses (SARS-1, MERS-CoV) do not change that much, though the others are far less contagious, but more lethal. SARS-CoV-2 is playing by different rules.
3) nope. The COVID-19 vaccine (pfizer/moderna, at least) is geared specifically for an antigen on the large surface protein. This is not shared with those coronaviruses that cause the common cold.

Thank you.